Big Event this Weekend at Averasboro

History will come alive this weekend at Averasboro.  Come visit Oak Grove Plantation House, an original home used as a Hospital during the Battle of Averasboro.  There will be both Confederate and Union Re-inactors on hand.  You can tour the Plantation House, walk through the Camps, see live demonstrations, or purchase wares from the sutlers.

The Oak Grove Plantation’s living history will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday. There will also be food available for purchase.  Cost will be $5 for adults, and children under 12 will be admitted free.

To find out more about Oak Grove and the event, read
“Living history meets cannon balls, encampments, and possible ghosts.”

 

January Meeting Moved to February 1st

The regular scheduled Camp Meeting has been moved to Saturday, December 1st at David Vinson’s house.

We will be having a Lunchtime Fish Fry, Camp Meeting, and Cannon Demonstration & Live Fire.   Cost for meal $6

Schedule

10 AM   Start gathering at David Vinson’s to fellowship and cook

Noon-12:30   Lunch (Fish Fry)

1 pm   Camp Business Meeting

2 pm   Cannon Demonstration & Live Fire

 

 

 

Last Roll Call – Ronnie Horne

ronniehorne

Ronald Wayne Horne (“Ronnie”) has answered his Last Roll Call.  The original Color Sergeant and Charter Member of the Cumberland Plough Boys will “forward the colors” to the Promised Land.  Ronnie passed away on January 1, 2014 at age 56.

Ronnie was a loyal Southerner who was a friend to all who broke bread with the Plough Boys.  He would always greet you with smile and a few jokes or stories.  He will truly be missed.

Ronnie was the son of the late Roy and Annie Dale James Horne.  In addition to
his  parents he was predeceased by a sister, Betty Joe Sparks and
brothers, William “Bill” Horne and David Horne.  He was Supervisor of
Street Maintenance for the City of Fayetteville.

Funeral services will be at 2:00 PM, Monday, January 6 in Freedom Biker
Church of Fayetteville, 455 Rock Hill Rd., with Pastor J. D. Tew
officiating. Burial will follow at Macedonia Baptist Church Cemetery,
5064 Macedonia Church Rd. Visitation will be from 6 to 8 PM, Sunday,
January 5 at Butler Funeral Home, 6535 Clinton Rd., Stedman.

Ronnie is survived by his wife Randi Horne of the home; daughter,
Rowna Simmons of Little River, SC; brother, Milton Horne of Hope Mills;
sisters, Delores Tyler of Eastover and Judy Horne of Salemburg; and 2
grandchildren, Donnie Locklear and Danielle Locklear.  Also surviving is
his beloved dog, “Henry”.

ronniehornecharter

Ronnie Horne signing the Cumberland Plough Boys Charter

 

Ploughboy Christmas Party fitting end to 2013

The Ploughboys ended 2013 with a festive get together.  76 were in attendance to celebrate the Christmas Season and to gather together and swap tales.   Floyd Starling and Richard Horne prepared a fine feast that included ribeye steak, baked potatoes, salad, and desert.

2013 Chrismas Party

2013 Chrismas Party

2013 got off to a great start with a bang as the Edenton Bell Battery shot the cannon in January at David Vinson’s house.  2013 accomplishments included the formation of the camp store, a successful vidalia onion sale, two store outings in Stedman and one each in Rocky Mount, Campbelton, and Murfreesboro.  Many confederate graves were recorded and the website had many soldier pages added.  The membership at the end of the year was 45, along with 2 associates.

May 2014 be even more productive.

Photos from the Private Willis Grave Dedication

Gene Willis (Great Grandson), Tom Taylor (Southern Brigade Commander) Ronnie Roach (NC Division Chief of Staff), W. S. Jackson (Commander Cumberland Plough Boys), and Mike Willis (2nd Great Grandson)

Gene Willis (Great Grandson), Tom Taylor (Southern Brigade Commander) Ronnie Roach (NC Division Chief of Staff), W. S. Jackson (Commander Cumberland Plough Boys), and Mike Willis (2nd Great Grandson)

 

Posting of the Colors by Mack Eason & Link Campbell

Posting of the Colors by Mack Eason & Link Campbell

 

Faye Willis Madden delivers message on the Willis family.  Commander Jackson stands nearby.

Faye Willis Madden delivers message on the Willis family. Commander Jackson stands nearby.

 

Honor Guard Stands Ready

Honor Guard Stands Ready

 

Ronnie Roach delivers the Inspirational Message with Link Campbell, Mack Eason, and Greg Maxwell in the background

Ronnie Roach delivers the Inspirational Message with Link Campbell, Mack Eason, and Greg Maxwell in the background

Unveiling of the Stone by Mack Eason and Link Campbell

Unveiling of the Stone by Mack Eason and Link Campbell

 

Gene Willis and Grandsons place the Wreath

Gene Willis and Grandsons place the Wreath

 

Grave Marker for Isaac Sims Willis with the Colors

Grave Marker for Isaac Sims Willis with the Colors

 

Honorary Volley fired by Honor Guard (includes Ploughboys Dwight Lovick, Ken Bell, and Mickey Broadwell)

Honorary Volley fired by Honor Guard (includes Ploughboys Dwight Lovick, Ken Bell, and Mickey Broadwell)

Link Campbell plays "Taps"

Link Campbell plays “Taps”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Private Isaac Sims Willis to be Honored

A grave dedication ceremony for Private Isaac Sims Willis will be held on October 13th at 2 p.m. at the Willis Family Cemetery. The Willis Family Cemetery is located in the northern part of Bladen County on Chickenfoot Road, just north of Pages Lake Road.

Isaac Sims Willis was born on May 11, 1815, the son of Jeremiah Willis (1798-1825) and Abigail Sims (1795-1872). He was a farmer in Bladen County until he enlist in the 8th North Carolina Senior Reserves on May 14, 1864. He originally served in Captain David Callihan’s Company, but transferred to Captain Neill McNeill’s Company on November 10, 1864. The 8th Senior Reserves main duty was to pursue conscripts.

Isaac Sims Willis married Flora Ann McArthur (1812-1905) on September 4, 1844. They had nine children: Francis Marion Willis (1844-1924), Susanna Willis (1847-1912), Thomas Jefferson Willis (1848-1907), Henrietta Willis (1849-1875), Isaac Newton Willis (1849-1851), Narcissa Willis (1851-1915), Mary Isabella Willis (1852-1927), and John Edwin Willis (1857-1916).

Great Grandson, Gene Willis and 2nd Great Grandson, Mike Willis have obtained and placed the marker.  The Willis Family cordially invites those who wish to honor this soldier and his family to attend the memorial service.

 

Grandson of Captain James Smith Evans contacts the Camp

James Smith Evans, III recently discovered our website and decided to contact us by e-mail.  Mr. Evans graciously has sent us a couple of photos of Captain James Smith Evans.

Captain James Smith Evans

Captain James Smith Evans

The second photo is a family portrait.   Captain James Evans is wearing the bow tie.

Family of James Smith Evans & Lucy Dickson Pearsall

Family of James Smith Evans & Lucy Dickson Pearsall

Mix-up in Confederate Records Discovered

Renowned Civil War Author Wade Sokolosky delivered the program at the June meeting. In compiling research for his upcoming book on the Battle of Wise Forks, Sokolosky discovered an oddity in the Confederate Service Records. Soldiers who were wounded near Kinston were reported as having been immediately sent to the Confederate General Hospital at Greensboro, and then sent on a day or two later to the Confederate General Hospital at Raleigh. It would seem that a wounded soldier would be sent to the closest hospital, not by-passing several hospitals along the way. Even if this occurred, why would all of the soldiers have been sent way out to Greensboro?

Sokolosky has proven that an error does exist in the Confederate Records in the National Archives File. He has proven through several sources that a Confederate General Hospital did exist at Goldsboro, even though the National Archives shows no Hospital at Goldsboro. City of Goldsboro records and historical markers identify the location of the Hospital. Sokolosky also uncovered a diary of a nurse who worked in the Hospital. In short, the Confederate General Hospital was at Goldsboro and on March 11, 1865 due to the advancing Federals, the Hospital was move to Greensboro. Unfortunately the same register was used and there was no notation of the move in the Confederate Records. The National Archive workers made an understandable error in recording all of the activities of this Hospital was at Greensboro. The Hospital Register they received did come from Greensboro. The hospital actually opened in Greensboro on March 19, 1865. An entry in the nurse’s diary provides proof of these dates.

Hopefully upcoming addendums to the North Carolina Roster of Troops will correct the location where the soldiers were treated. If your ancestor is reported as having died at Greensboro, you may want to search around Goldsboro for his grave.

Plough Boys have close ties to Stedman

John Culbreth Blocker (1811-1890) along with his wife, Julia Ann Braddy (1815-1891) settled in eastern Cumberland County in 1841.  There he built a stagecoach house and a post office.  The area became known as Blockersville (later incorporated as the Town of Stedman).   John and Julia raised three children:  Octavius Harvey Blocker (1840-1905), Charles Henry Blocker (1842-1911), and Francis Eugene Blocker (1850-1883).

The Cumberland Plough Boys were organized on June 1, 1861 at Bethany Crossroads, which is 3 miles northwest of Stedman.  The Plough Boys totally comprised of a group of farmers were originally known as the 14th North Carolina Volunteers, but the unit’s designation was later changed to the 24th North Carolina Troops, Company F.  The Company’s first Commander was Captain Charles Henry Blocker.  His brother, Octavius was a 1st Sergeant, but was quickly promoted to 2nd Lieutenant.  The Blockers were the original inhabitants of the area we know as Stedman.

Charles Henry Blocker remained Captain of the Plough Boys until May of 1862 when he transferred to the Staff of Colonel Lamb at Fort Fisher with the 36th North Carolina.  In January 1865, he was captured at Fort Fisher and confined at Fort Columbus in New York Harbor.  On March 5, 1865 he was paroled.   Charles Blocker married Sally Cromwell, and they raised 13 children.  Before 1900, they moved to St. Petersburg, Florida.

Octavius Harvey Blocker remained with the Plough Boys until February 15, 1862 when he was appointed Captain of the 36th North Carolina, 2nd Company C.  This company was stationed at Fort Fisher.  Due to illness, Octavius had to resign his commission in August, 1862.  Octavius married Susan Moore.  They moved to Old Fort, North Carolina.

The town of Stedman incorporated many years after the Blockers left the area.  However, the town’s roots can be traced back to the leaders of the Cumberland Plough Boys.