Ploughboys at Oak Grove Plantation

The first living history was held at Oak Grove Plantation.  It was a huge success.  The Plough Boys (pictures below) were heavily involved.

The public was allowed to tour the plantation house, and could see the cannon ball hole left by Confederate troops.  The Plough Boys participated in cannon and mortar demonstrations.   The Camp Store was set up in the kitchen house.  Many folks stopped in and bought a few items.

Overall it was a great event.  The plan will be to have a full-scale reenactment next year.

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Dwight & Susan operate the Camp Store

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Plough Boys at Oak Grove Plantation

Commander Jackson with General Johnston

Commander Jackson with General Johnston

 

 

Big Event this Weekend at Averasboro

History will come alive this weekend at Averasboro.  Come visit Oak Grove Plantation House, an original home used as a Hospital during the Battle of Averasboro.  There will be both Confederate and Union Re-inactors on hand.  You can tour the Plantation House, walk through the Camps, see live demonstrations, or purchase wares from the sutlers.

The Oak Grove Plantation’s living history will be from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday. There will also be food available for purchase.  Cost will be $5 for adults, and children under 12 will be admitted free.

To find out more about Oak Grove and the event, read
“Living history meets cannon balls, encampments, and possible ghosts.”

 

Ploughboy Christmas Party fitting end to 2013

The Ploughboys ended 2013 with a festive get together.  76 were in attendance to celebrate the Christmas Season and to gather together and swap tales.   Floyd Starling and Richard Horne prepared a fine feast that included ribeye steak, baked potatoes, salad, and desert.

2013 Chrismas Party

2013 Chrismas Party

2013 got off to a great start with a bang as the Edenton Bell Battery shot the cannon in January at David Vinson’s house.  2013 accomplishments included the formation of the camp store, a successful vidalia onion sale, two store outings in Stedman and one each in Rocky Mount, Campbelton, and Murfreesboro.  Many confederate graves were recorded and the website had many soldier pages added.  The membership at the end of the year was 45, along with 2 associates.

May 2014 be even more productive.

Photos from the Private Willis Grave Dedication

Gene Willis (Great Grandson), Tom Taylor (Southern Brigade Commander) Ronnie Roach (NC Division Chief of Staff), W. S. Jackson (Commander Cumberland Plough Boys), and Mike Willis (2nd Great Grandson)

Gene Willis (Great Grandson), Tom Taylor (Southern Brigade Commander) Ronnie Roach (NC Division Chief of Staff), W. S. Jackson (Commander Cumberland Plough Boys), and Mike Willis (2nd Great Grandson)

 

Posting of the Colors by Mack Eason & Link Campbell

Posting of the Colors by Mack Eason & Link Campbell

 

Faye Willis Madden delivers message on the Willis family.  Commander Jackson stands nearby.

Faye Willis Madden delivers message on the Willis family. Commander Jackson stands nearby.

 

Honor Guard Stands Ready

Honor Guard Stands Ready

 

Ronnie Roach delivers the Inspirational Message with Link Campbell, Mack Eason, and Greg Maxwell in the background

Ronnie Roach delivers the Inspirational Message with Link Campbell, Mack Eason, and Greg Maxwell in the background

Unveiling of the Stone by Mack Eason and Link Campbell

Unveiling of the Stone by Mack Eason and Link Campbell

 

Gene Willis and Grandsons place the Wreath

Gene Willis and Grandsons place the Wreath

 

Grave Marker for Isaac Sims Willis with the Colors

Grave Marker for Isaac Sims Willis with the Colors

 

Honorary Volley fired by Honor Guard (includes Ploughboys Dwight Lovick, Ken Bell, and Mickey Broadwell)

Honorary Volley fired by Honor Guard (includes Ploughboys Dwight Lovick, Ken Bell, and Mickey Broadwell)

Link Campbell plays "Taps"

Link Campbell plays “Taps”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Private Isaac Sims Willis to be Honored

A grave dedication ceremony for Private Isaac Sims Willis will be held on October 13th at 2 p.m. at the Willis Family Cemetery. The Willis Family Cemetery is located in the northern part of Bladen County on Chickenfoot Road, just north of Pages Lake Road.

Isaac Sims Willis was born on May 11, 1815, the son of Jeremiah Willis (1798-1825) and Abigail Sims (1795-1872). He was a farmer in Bladen County until he enlist in the 8th North Carolina Senior Reserves on May 14, 1864. He originally served in Captain David Callihan’s Company, but transferred to Captain Neill McNeill’s Company on November 10, 1864. The 8th Senior Reserves main duty was to pursue conscripts.

Isaac Sims Willis married Flora Ann McArthur (1812-1905) on September 4, 1844. They had nine children: Francis Marion Willis (1844-1924), Susanna Willis (1847-1912), Thomas Jefferson Willis (1848-1907), Henrietta Willis (1849-1875), Isaac Newton Willis (1849-1851), Narcissa Willis (1851-1915), Mary Isabella Willis (1852-1927), and John Edwin Willis (1857-1916).

Great Grandson, Gene Willis and 2nd Great Grandson, Mike Willis have obtained and placed the marker.  The Willis Family cordially invites those who wish to honor this soldier and his family to attend the memorial service.

 

Cumberland Plough Boys and Edenton Bell Battery Start Year off with a Bang!

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Plough Boys take Beaver Dam

 

On Saturday, January 5th the Cumberland Plough Boys Camp 2187 kicked off the new year with a day of remembering our ancestors.

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Plough Boys Ken Bell, W. S. Jackson, Dwight Lovick, and David Vinson man the cannon

In the morning a few members of the Camp met at Cross Creek Cemetery in Fayetteville to kick off the Confederate Soldiers Project.  Mike Willis, Durwood Beasley, and Mark Whitley spent a few hours recording grave information and taking photos.

Afterwards, the Camp met for lunch at Lt. Commander Vinson’s residence for a spread of barbeque, chicken, and fish.   Shortly afterward, the Edenton Bell Battery demonstrated cannon fire and the role of the artillery men.  Beaver Dam was under siege as the cannon was fired approximately twenty times.   Members of the Plough Boys and some of the locals got an opportunity to fire the big gun.  It was a good thing nobody was firing back, because unlimbering the cannon and move quickly would have been difficult for the troops considering all the food they put away.

A special thanks goes out to the Edenton Bell Battery for providing us with this great educational opportunity.  A good time was had by all.

 

Confederate Soldiers Project

The Confederate Soldiers Project is officially underway.   The List of Confederate Companies is now posted, along with the Soldiers who comprise those companies.  This is the first step in what is expected to be a decade long project of identifying and recording the military and family information on all the Confederate Soldiers from the five-county area surrounding Fayetteville.

We are now in the process of identifying Soldiers who are originally from the five-county area but served in Companies that didn’t have a large contigent of soldiers from this area.  We are also developing an alphabetical list of all the soldiers for cemetery research.

An Our Ancestors page will be next on the agenda for the Web Page.  This page will provide links to pages on the Confederate Soldiers who are lineal ancestors of Camp Members and collateral ancestors for those who joined the Sons of Confederate Veterans by that relationship.  We look forward to sharing our proud history.

Plough Boys Invade Charleston

Forty-two members and guests of the Cumberland Plough Boys, Black River Tigers, and the Hoke-McLauchlin Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp visited Charleston.  The group took a walking tour of Historic Charleston which was highlighted by a visit to the Confederate Museum.

House in Charleston

The Confederate Museum has an impressive collection of original artifacts from the War Between the States (more commonly but incorrectly called the Civil War).   Original Items included Regimental Flags, Confederate War Bonds, Confederate Uniforms, Canteens, UCV Reunion Medals, UDC Convention Badges, Photographs, and even a lock of hair from General Robert E. Lee.   The collection is impressive and I can honestly say if all 42 people got together, we still could not accurately describe all of the items.  While I understand the no photography restriction, I do wish the U.D.C. would hire a professional photographer to photograph all of the items and create a souvenir book for sale.  I certainly will visit the museum again when I can have much longer to look over every item.

In the afternoon, the group visited the Warren Lasch Conservation Center to view the remains of the Hunley.   The Hunley was the first submarine to successfully sink an opposing ship in battle.  The Hunley certainly was one of the first innovations to lead to our modern day submarine.  The process of retrieving the submarine from the ocean and preserving it today are quite impressive.  It is only surpassed, by the bravery and sacrifice given by the members of its three crews.

Below you will see a photo of the “New Hunley Crew” made up of members of all three SCV Camps.   The photo is taken of a replica of the original vessel.  Further below, you will get an appreciation of the minuteness of size of the Hunely’s Hatch.  Ken Bell, who is rather slender, had quite a time getting through it.

The New Hunley Crew

 

Ken Bell Squeeze

Ken Bell squeezes through hatch of the Hunley replica