Robert Alexander Draughon

Robert Alexander Draughon
June 29, 1846 – June 10, 1895

Alternate Spelling: Robert A. Draughon, Robert Draughon, Robert A. Drawhon
1860 Residence: Mingo, Sampson County, North Carolina

Military Record
April 1864 – Enlisted in Sampson County, NC
2nd North Carolina Junior Reserves, Company A
Rank: Corporal
August 30, 1864 – Discharged “by virtue of detail as farmer”
October 8, 1864 – Enlisted at Clinton, NC
North Carolina Detailed & Petitioned Men, Gidden’s Co

Parents
James Campbell Draughon 1801 – 1868
Esther Avera 1805 – 1870

Siblings
William Avera Draughon 1836 – 1862       20th NC, Co H
John Wells Draughon 1838 – 1862
Hardy Hewes Draughon 1839 – 1920       20th NC, Co H
Edith Catherine Draughon 1840 – 1882
James Campbell Draughon 1841 – 1920       20th NC Co H
Mary Jane Draughon 1843 – 1915
Sarah Elizabeth Draughon 1844 – 1883

Wife
Ella Jane Alderman 1860 – 1928

Children
Lillian Alderman Draughon 1890 – 1971
Alexandra Jane Draughon 1891 – 1936
Robert Alexander Draughon 1893 – 1972
John P. Draughon 1894 – 1922

Burial
Greenwood Cemetery
Dunn, NC

Robert Draughon Grave

Robert Draughon Grave

Doctor Thomas Jones

Doctor Thomas Jones
December 14, 1831 – December 12, 1899

Alternate Spelling: D. T. Jones, Dock Thomas Jones, Dock Jones, Doctor T. Jones, or Thomas Jones
1860 Residence: Summerville, Harnett County, NC

Doctor Thomas Jones

Doctor Thomas Jones

Military
April 29, 1862 – Enlisted at Harnett County, NC
50th North Carolina Regiment, Company H
Rank: Private
March 8, 1865 – Captured at or near Fayetteville, NC
Sent to New Bern
April 25, 1865 – Confined at Fort Monroe, VA
May 1, 1865 – Transferred to Newport News, VA
June 30, 1865 – Released after taking the Oath of Allegiance

Parents
Thomas Jones Jr. 1790 – 1846
Alcy ?   1790

Siblings
Daniel Jones
John Avner Jones
Revel Jones
Mary Jones 1815
Allen Jones 1826
Bryant Jones 1830
Ervin Jones 1838

Wife
Sarah Lee Jernigan  1831 – 1905

Children
William Pierce Jones 1857 – 1933
Cornelius Washington Jones 1859 – 1934
John C. Jones 1861 – 1920
Mary Ida Jones 1864 – 1935
Louis Walter Jones 1867 – 1935
Sara Ellen Jones 1869 – 1946
Lou “Lovie” Ella Jones 1871 – 1910
David Elmond Jones 1874 – 1923

Burial
Greenwood Cemetery
Dunn, NC

 

Doctor Thomas Jones Grave

Doctor Thomas Jones Grave

Plough Boys Invade Charleston

Forty-two members and guests of the Cumberland Plough Boys, Black River Tigers, and the Hoke-McLauchlin Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp visited Charleston.  The group took a walking tour of Historic Charleston which was highlighted by a visit to the Confederate Museum.

House in Charleston

The Confederate Museum has an impressive collection of original artifacts from the War Between the States (more commonly but incorrectly called the Civil War).   Original Items included Regimental Flags, Confederate War Bonds, Confederate Uniforms, Canteens, UCV Reunion Medals, UDC Convention Badges, Photographs, and even a lock of hair from General Robert E. Lee.   The collection is impressive and I can honestly say if all 42 people got together, we still could not accurately describe all of the items.  While I understand the no photography restriction, I do wish the U.D.C. would hire a professional photographer to photograph all of the items and create a souvenir book for sale.  I certainly will visit the museum again when I can have much longer to look over every item.

In the afternoon, the group visited the Warren Lasch Conservation Center to view the remains of the Hunley.   The Hunley was the first submarine to successfully sink an opposing ship in battle.  The Hunley certainly was one of the first innovations to lead to our modern day submarine.  The process of retrieving the submarine from the ocean and preserving it today are quite impressive.  It is only surpassed, by the bravery and sacrifice given by the members of its three crews.

Below you will see a photo of the “New Hunley Crew” made up of members of all three SCV Camps.   The photo is taken of a replica of the original vessel.  Further below, you will get an appreciation of the minuteness of size of the Hunely’s Hatch.  Ken Bell, who is rather slender, had quite a time getting through it.

The New Hunley Crew

 

Ken Bell Squeeze

Ken Bell squeezes through hatch of the Hunley replica